• 25 Week Old Baby Milestones 👶

    At this point, baby is still exploring the world through their senses, and this includes tasting anything and everything they can get their hands on! Now that she is beginning to eat solid food, you may notice that she explores her food by tasting it, spitting it out, and even playing with it in her hands. As much as this messy experience might make you cringe, try to embrace it, Mama!

    Babies who play with their food are actually developing some pretty important math and science skills! All this “messy play” is baby feeling the textures in their hands and figuring out how to get the food from point A to point B. That’s some pretty impressive stuff! But if you need some help figuring out how to make all of this messy food exploration work in your home, try some of these tips:

    • Place baby close to the floor, on top of an easy-to-clean tablecloth. Think something like this chair placed on top of this. (You can also put a tarp under their high chair for easy clean-up.)
    • Get a silicone bib with a nice “container” to catch excess food.
    • Coincide the messier, staining foods, like blueberries, with bath days!

    Some other things to consider… Even though it may be months before baby is able to use utensils properly, you can still introduce child-safe utensils to further their food exploration. And if you’re spoon-feeding, be sure to give baby a bigger piece of food to gnaw on, so he can explore feeding himself.

    It’s easy to get caught up in the idea that food is for nourishing our bodies, and that’s it. But when you stop and think about everything children are learning throughout the process of eating (sight, smell, texture, taste, touch, socialization), it might make it easier to relax and enjoy this messy experience. Afterall, we all want our babies to grow up with a healthy, excited attitude towards food, right?!

    25 week old baby Mama Natural Baby Tracker
  • You at 25 Weeks Postpartum 👩

    Some women find that as their baby eats more and more solid food, breastfeeding reduces, causing hormones to shift and your period to return. This shift can bring on an emotional response for some. In addition to the emotions that are flowing because of the hormonal changes happening in your body, many women now realize their body is again capable of becoming pregnant. For those mamas who aren’t quite ready to jump back into the whole ‘making a baby’ game just yet, check out some of these natural contraceptive methods.

    And don’t fret if your period isn’t what you remember, For some women, their first postpartum period may seem much different than what they were previously used to. Some find that their flow is much lighter, while others may find it much, much heavier. This is totally normal, as your body re-adjusts to life post-pregnancy. Check out this article for a refresher on your first period after pregnancy.

    While your period may not be the monthly visit you were anticipating, you can look at this time as a sign that your body has come full circle after the delivery of your little one, and things are moving along as nature has intended. Remember to keep your body nourished and rest (as much as you can!) during this time. Try to think of it as a time of monthly renewal and rejuvenation.

  • Genevieve’s Week 25 Postpartum Update 🌞

  • 25 Week Old Baby Reader Story 💡
    Oh, Hello There, Old Friend.

    Baby Week to Week 25 Mama Natural

    Mama and baby take a selfie.

    You can read every book on the planet, and there’s still bound to be some surprises after giving birth. One of the most elusive of which is your first postpartum period. I got my first period after giving birth at six months postpartum. And to say I wasn’t expecting it at all is an understatement.

    I thought that if you breastfeed, your menstrual cycle won’t return until after you’ve weaned your baby. Boy, was I wrong about that! What made it worse was the terrible cramps that accompanied my first postpartum period. I had a c-section, and I had stabbing cramps at the exact location of my scar—ouch! I was also surprised to find that my period had a major affect on my milk supply. Though I wasn’t feeling well, I had to feed more then normal, because my supply had dipped so low. Thankfully, once my period was over, my supply returned to normal, as if nothing had ever happened.

    I’m now almost eight months postpartum, and my periods are still irregular—they’re more painful and heavier than they were before giving birth to my daughter—but I’m hanging in there, hoping it’s all temporary!

  • Hot Topics for Week 25 🔥

  • Try This With Your 25 Week Old Baby

    • Introduce new foods to baby slowly and repetitively