• 16 Week Old Baby Milestones 👶

    This week, baby is working hard on her hand-eye coordination. Her fine motor development is strengthening, and she is better able to reach for (and grasp!) toys and objects. You can help her fine-tune this hand-eye coordination by moving a toy or an object in front of her. Watch to see if her eyes track the object, and her hands reach for it!

    Now that your little one is four months old (hooray!), you may begin to notice her personality peeking through. How does he hold up in new situations? Did you know there are nine different traits that describe a child’s temperament and the way he or she reacts to and experiences the world?

    Look out for these nine traits in your little one:

    • Activity level: Are they highly active, or less active?
    • Distractibility: Easily distracted, or more focused?
    • Intensity: Intense personality, or more relaxed and easy going?
    • Regularity: Highly regular in routines, or more spontaneous?
    • Sensitivity: Highly sensitive, or less reactive?
    • Approachability: Highly approachable, or more timid?
    • Adaptability: Adapts easily, or takes more time (slow-to-warm)?
    • Persistence: Highly persistent, or bored easily?
    • Mood: Jovial and fast to smile or more serious and pensive?

    From these nine personality traits, you can get to know your little one on a deeper level, and help her experience the world around her in her own special way!

    16 week old baby – Mom Sarah Lynette Mama Natural Baby Tracker

    Photo submitted by reader Sarah Lynette of her 16 week old son.

  • You at 16 Weeks Postpartum 👩

    Just when things began to settle down in the sleep department (maybe your little one was even sleeping through the night!)... BOOM—they are sleeping like a newborn again. Waking up two, three, maybe even four times a night! But how can this be? It’s called a sleep regression, and it happens around the four-month mark. It can last anywhere from a few days to a few weeks. And, mama, I’m sorry to say: It doesn’t stop there. Babies generally move through sleep regressions at four months, nine months, and 18 months!

    The main reason babies go through a sleep regression at four months is due to the fact that they’ve ditched their “newborn” sleeping patterns and are now sleeping more like adults do. This huge shift in sleep results in more frequent night wakings and interrupted sleep during naps. Here are a few ways you can help ease this transition and help baby come out of the regression in a smooth, peaceful way:

    • Stimulate baby during the day. Regressions happen during wonder weeks, so stimulate that growing brain in effort to wipe them out by bedtime. Try things like newborn games, tummy time, and reading books.
    • Get fresh air. One study suggests babies who spend more time outdoors in the afternoon sleep better.
    • Try baby massage. Infant massage lowers levels of cortisol, the stress hormone, and stimulates melatonin production to help baby fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.
    • Stick to your routine. Even if your nights look a little different these days, help your little one to sleep the same way he is used to. Any change will be picked up by him, and he will expect this new routine (even when the regression is long gone!).
    • Try a wearable sleep sack. Remember, a swaddle usually isn’t appropriate anymore—if baby is rolling, it presents a suffocation risk, But there are many wearable sleep sacks that can provide similar comfort and promote sleep. Check out this article for good options.
    • Ask for help! This may be a time of extreme exhaustion (for both baby and mama!) Don’t be afraid to ask for some help while you catch up on some much-needed sleep during this sleep regression.

    Above all, know that this is just a phase, and baby will soon get back to a sleeping pattern that works for the whole family. Stick to your mama instincts and ask for help when you need it!

  • Genevieve’s Week 16 Postpartum Update 🌞

  • Hot Topics for Week 16 🔥

  • Try This With Your 16 Week Old Baby

    • Start teaching baby sign language
    • Provide quiet space for self-motivated play
    • Do regular kegel exercises