Name Meaning Origin Popularity Other Gender
Abbott

Father, priest

English

Addison

Son of Adam

English

Alston

Elf stone

English

Anderson

Son of Andrew

English

Ashby

Ash tree home

English

Barker

“A tanner,” in allusion to the bark used in the process.

English

Baron

Young warrior

Hebrew

Barrett

Quarrelsome

English

Barton

Barley settlement

English

Beckham

Beck's homestead

English

Benson

Son of Ben

Benton

Town in the bent grass

English

Blackstone

Black stone

English

Boone

Good

Latin

Brady

Descendant of Bradach

Irish

Brando

Sword; fiery torch, beacon

German

Branson

Son of Brand

English

Brent

Hill, mount

English

Briggs

Bridges

English

Brighton

Bridge settlement

English

Brock

Badger-like

English

Bronson

Son of the brown man

English

Brooks

Small stream

English

Calder

Rough waters; stream

Scottish

Cameron

Crooked nose

Scottish

Carlisle

Fort at Luguvalium

English

Carson

Son of Carr

Scottish

Carter

Cart user

English

Carver

One who carves wood

English

Case

Box

French

Casen
Casey

Alert, watchful

Irish

Chandler

Candle maker, seller

French

Channing

Young wolf; official of the church

French

Cheney

Oak tree; oak-hearted

French

Clark

Cleric

English

Clarkson
Clinton

Fenced settlement

English

Cohen

Priest

Hebrew

Collier

Coal miner

English

Cooper

Barrel maker

English

Corbin

Raven

English

Cortez

Courteous

Spanish

Crawford

Ford of the crows

English

Crosby

At the cross

Scandinavian

Cruz

Holy cross

Spanish

Cullen

Good-looking lad; handsome

Irish

Davidson

Beloved; son of David

Hebrew

Davis

Son of David

English

Dawson

Son of David

English

Dempsey

Proud

Irish

Denton

“The town pasture,” from the Anglo-Saxon denn (pasture) and tun (town or village).

Duff

Swarthy

Gaelic

Easton

East town

English

Edgerton

English

Edison

Son of Edward

English

Evans

God is gracious; born of yew; youth

Welsh

Everett

Brave boar

English

Fallon
Farley

Meadow of the sheep; meadow of the bulls

English

Ford

River crossing

English

Fox

Fox

English

Franklin

Free landholder

English

Frasier

Of the forest men

Scottish

Gaines

To get

Gallagher

Foreign helper

Irish

Garrison

Spear-fortified town; protection, stronghold

English

Gibson

Son of Gilbert

English

Glover

Maker of gloves

English

Goodwin

Good friend

English

Graham

Gravelled homestead

English

Granger

Farmer

French

Grant

Great

English

Griffin

Strong in faith

Welsh

Griffith

Strong chief

Welsh

Hagan

Youthful one; noble, of the highest race; exalted son; a place of safety, sanctuary; shelter

Scandinavian

Haines

Dweller by the enclosure

English

Hale

Hero; from the hall

English

Halen

Hero; from the hall

English

Halston
Hamilton

Flat-topped hill

English

Hanson

Son of Hans

Scandinavian

Harding

Son of the courageous one

English

Hardy

Bold, brave

German

Harris

Son of Harry

English

Harrison

Son of Harry

English

Hartley

Stag meadow

English

Hendrix

Son of Hendrick

English

Hewitt

French

Hilton

Hill settlement

English

Hogan

Youth

Irish

Holmes

Holly; islands in the river

English

Houston

Hugh's town; settlement on the hill

Irish

Hudson

Son of Hudd

English

Hurley

Sea tide

Irish

Hyatt

Lofty gate

English

Ingram

Raven of peace; raven of Anglia

Scandinavian

Jackson

Son of Jack

English

Jagger

Carter

English

Jameson

Son of James

English

Jarvis

“A mender of pots and pans; a tinker.” Based on the Latin gero (carry) and vas (a vessel).

French

Jefferson

Son of Jeffrey

English

Jensen

Son of Jens

Scandinavian

Johnson

Son of John

English

Jones
Kane

Battle

Irish

Keane

Fighter; sharp, keen wit or eye

Irish

Kennedy

Helmet head

Irish

Kingston

King's town

English

Landon

Long hill

English

Landry

“The ruler of the land,” from the Germanic land (land) and rihhi (ruler).

English

Lane

Pathway

English

Langston

Long stone

English

Latham

The barn

Scandinavian

Ledger

Speared tribe

English

Leighton

Meadow settlement

English

Lennon

Dear one

Irish

Lincoln

Lake colony

English

Livingston

Leofwine's settlement

English

Locke

Woods; fortified place; pond

German

Logan

Small hollow

Scottish

Maddock

Charitable, benevolent

Welsh

Madison

Greek

Malone

Devoted to St. John

Irish

Manning

Son of the man

English

Marsden

Swampy valley

English

Marston

Town near the marsh

English

Mason

Stoneworker

English

Mercer

Storekeeper

English

Merrick

“A serving ruler,” from the Latin mereri (to serve) and the hypothetical root rik (ruler).

Welsh

Meyer

Farmer; bright one

Hebrew

Miller

One who grinds grain

English

Monroe

Mouth of the river Rotha, in Ireland

Scottish

Morris

A variant form of Maurice.

Latin

Morrisey

Son of More

English

Morrison

Son of Maurice

English

Morton

Moor town

English

Moss

Saviour

English

Murray

Lord, master

Gaelic

Newton

New town

English

Nixon

Son of Nicholas

English

Norris

Northerner

French

Osbourne

Bear god

English

Palmer

Pilgrim

English

Parker

Keeper of the park

English

Parrish

Ecclesiastical locality

French

Paxton

Poecc's settlement

English

Perry

“(The man who lives in the cottage near) the pear tree,” ultimately from the Latin pirum, a pear.

Modern

Pierce

A variant form of Peter.

Greek

Powell

Son of Howell

English

Prescott

Priest's cottage

English

Presley

Priest's meadow

English

Quincy

Estate of the fifth son

French

Quinn

Descendent of Conn

Irish

Radley

Meadow of reeds; red meadow

English

Ramsey

Garlic island

English

Reagan

Gaelic

Reed

Red

English

Reilly

Outgoing people

Irish

Rhodes

Where roses grow

German

Riggs

Son of Rigg

English

Ripley

Shouting man's meadow

English

Rockwell

Rock spring

English

Rogan

Red-headed

Irish

Roosevelt

Rose field

Danish

Sanders

Son of Alexander

English

Slater

Hewer of slates

English

Smith

Blacksmith

English

Spencer

Dispenser of provisions

English

Steele

Like steel

English

Sutton

Southern settlement

English

Swain

Boy, lad; one who herds swine

Scandinavian

Talbot

“(The man who wears) low boots," based on the Latin talus (ankle) and the Old French bote (shoe, boot).

Tanner

Leather maker

English

Tatum

Tata's home

English

Thompson

Twin

Aramaic

Travers

To cross over

French

Truman

Loyal one

English

Turner

Wood-worker

English

Vernon

Alder grove

French

Wagner

Wagon-builder

German

Warner

Army guard

German

Washington

“From the washing village,” i.e., from the village near the river or stream where the women wash clothes, based on the Anglo-Saxon wascan (wash) and tun (village).

English

Watts
Webber

Weaver

German

Webster

Weaver

English

Whitford

White ford

English

Wilson

Son of William

English

Winslow

Friend's hill

English

York

Boar settlement; yew settlement

English

Young

English

Last names for boys used as first names are more in demand than ever. Some of today’s most popular names for boys fit the style, like Jackson, Parker, and Mason. People love them for a variety of reasons, whether they’re looking to honor someone or simply love the fashionable feel that comes with the surname style.

Super common last names like Smith and Jones make awesome first names, as they’re unexpected and have a bit of a secret agent vibe. Miller, Davis, and Wilson offer the same cool factor if you love the feel. A major plus to using these common names is the lack of spelling and pronunciation issues.

Uncommon last names for boys used as first names are popping up more often too to counteract the more common finds like Carter and Cameron. As seen in Everly, a name that’s witnessed a meteoric rise with girls, these are bursting with style that parents can’t get enough of. From these less common picks, we’ve seen Cruz, Hudson, and Harrison rise dramatically in popularity. Picks like Ashby, Landry, and Crosby are on our radar as the next stars to come from this group.

Last names are a great way to honor people you admire, too. Using last names for boys as first names is a clever way to honor a loved one. Say you love Great Uncle Horace, but not his first name. You could uses his surname Evans for the same effect. This is especially popular with musicians, with a spike seen in rock and roll picks like Jagger, Hendrix, and Lennon on the playground. Scientist surnames are great for brainy babes, with Edison and Newton just two awesome options among them. Of course, the most famous last names for boys are presidential picks, with Lincoln, Monroe, and Pierce being favorites with parents. Roosevelt and Ford are standouts in the group for us, as they have all-star appeal and crisp styling.

Give these surname names a shot for something different. You’ll be surprised at what you find.